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to expect when no one's expecting america's economic disaster" he discusses the implosion in the u.s. and its impact on the economy, culture and politics. this program last summer out in our -- lasts about an hour. >> host: welcome. there is a lot going on here and the main thesis is following the birth rate problem and what are the causes and consequences. along the way you touch on many topics including the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer childr
. a in it mr. last discusses the population implosion in the u.s. and its impact on the economy culture and politics. this program lasts about an hour >> host: jonathan welcome. this is a very meaty book and there's a lot going on in here. the main thesis of course is the falling birthrate problem and what are the causes of those falling birthrates and the consequences. the rising individualism and and american lives in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and society's going to be then you are able to tell what are the confines in which this reality will have to l
the ones in u.s. we have resources could solve them. and that in fact there may be an advantage to having older people who can be persuaded to join the work force or stay in longer. maybe you can bring more women in and train younger works so they can become productive. the thinking is well, this is the what happens in a modern society. let live with it. what do you say to that? >> guest: well, we'll have to look at it regardless if you think it's a good thing or a bad thing. i would say that it depends. right. it depends how deep a whole you're inspect. if you're japan where the fertility rate is 1.3 or 1.2 and there is zero immigration. there is no horizon for them to experience robust economic growth in the future. and what is more things get worse they wind up having the state fails in the pension obligations all sort of generational warfare recently the finance minister of japan but it was time for the old people of japan to hurry up and die and so you wind up sending the the number of workers retiring that gets smaller. you have two choices. the benefits to retiring where you can ta
and will deemphasize u.s. a customer so they are all connected together and the strategy you have to do is how do we create value so that there'll simultaneously winning? i will give you an example of whole whole foods that oftentimeoftentime s people might be a traitor. we created a foundation called the whole planet foundation which does microcredit loans around the world. we do those projects in the communities we are trading in so we open a project and costa rican and resource bananas, mangoes and coffin close to rico so we will be looking to locate the microcredit where we are doing business. someone might say you're being philanthropic with investors money. that is the type of theft basically. you should be philanthropic with your own money. in a narrow sense you could sort of make that case if it doesn't create value for the investors. what we found with the whole planet foundation is it is creating value for all of our stakeholders. our customers for example we have marked with within our stores and tell her customers what they are doing. once he or we do a prosperity campaign where they are
states? or u.s. optimistic about the ability of our government to continue to be a beacon for democracy and sort of inspired our citizenry in the same way that you feel corporate america can -- >> guest: you know i think the answer to that is it's complicated but the short answer is yes because i am an optimist. i think a lot of things going on in government these days tends to be more partisan. it seems that common sense is kind of gone out the window. it seems like there is not much agreement. it seems like no willingness to compromise but i know what goes around comes around and i hope some of the uncertainty goes away with time. i would have to say yes, i'm optimistic and surely there are some leaders there that understand the american people and can make that happen. >> host: the number of people you mentioned in the book that you dealt with who came from the world of business, people like steve rattner and a number of these individuals like you who were in business for a number of years and forever reason felt the call and a public duty to help the government or to help government
to sell e-books limited to only certain devices or applications. the suit was filedded in the u.s. district court for the southern district of new york. the finalists announced for the 33rd los angeles times book prizes. they are broken into ten categories including biography, current interests, fiction, history, and science and technology. among the finalists are jake tapper, robert car o, nate silver, and the winners will be announced april 19th, the night before the l.a. times festival of books effort for -- books. for the entire list of timistst, go to la times.com. like us on facebook at facebook.com/booktv. visit our welcomes, booktv.org and click on "news about books." at age 25, she was one of the wealthiest widows in the colonies, and during the revolution while in her mid-40s, she was considered an enemy by the british who threatened to take her hostage. later, she was our nation's first first lady at age 57. meet martha washington, monday night in the first program of c-span's new weekly series, "first ladies: influence and image," as we visit some of the places that in
? >> guest: gm as an example was the largest manufacturer in the u.s.. it lost faith in gm and its products. i think a corporation has to be trusted by its customers and to do that you have to sell a big product at a fair price and you have to stand behind it. you have to be involved in the communities. there's a lot of things to do. once you lose your reputation and business, it's tough to get it back. it doesn't happen overnight. you have to work at it. what you do to get it back is what i said you produce great products at a fair price. give employees that are engaged participating in the communities, you are receptive to certain things, but it doesn't come overnight. you have to stay with it and i think that's the way you get it back. >> host: as i said at the outset, this book is ultimately very optimistic about american business. where does your optimism comes from? what are the moments in your upbringing in a business career that you think contributed to your generally positive outlook about the business and about the country? >> guest: remember im from at&t and gm and i saw the powe
manufacturer in the u.s. its quality and product citing a corporation has to be trusted by its customers and to do that you have to sell a good product at a fair price. you have to stand behind it and be involved in the communities. there's a lot of things to do. once you lose your reputation in business, it's tough to get it back. it doesn't happen overnight. you have to work at it and it's just what i said to produce great products at a fair price. you have employees that are engaged, you are receptive to certain things, but it doesn't come overnight. if you have to stay with that. that's the way you get it back. >> host: this book is very optimistic about the business. where does your optimism come from. what are the moments in your upbringing and business career to george generally positive outlook and the business and the country? >> guest: remember i'm from at&t and gm and i saw the power of people and what they can do when they are responsible and have authority and you let them go. that is such a great resource that we forget about. look at with at&t did. there's iphone, wireless
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8